Advanced in vitro exposure systems.

Silica nanoparticles are less toxic to human lung cells when deposited at the air-liquid interface compared to conventional submerged exposure

19. Sep. 2014

Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology

2014, 5, 1590–1602 (doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.171)

Authors
Alicja Panas1, Andreas Comouth2, Harald Saathoff2, Thomas Leisner2, Marco Al-Rawi1, Michael Simon3, Gunnar Seemann3, Olaf Dössel3, Sonja Mülhopt4, Hanns-Rudolf Paur4, Susanne Fritsch-Decker1, Carsten Weiss1and Silvia Diabaté1

1 Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus North, Hermann- von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
2 Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
3 Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus South, Kaiserstraße 12, 76128 Karlsruhe, Germany
4 Institute for Technical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany

Exposition of humidified nanoparticles on A549 lung epithelia cells using the air-liquid interface. The experiments shows less cytotoxic and inflammatory responses of the cells to silica nanoparticles.

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