Advanced in vitro exposure systems.

2. Nov. 2020

Influence of the environmental relative humidity on the inflammatory response of skin model after exposure to various environmental pollutants

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2020.110350

Emeline Seurat a, Anthony Verdin b, Fabrice Cazier c, Dominique Courcot b, Richard Fitoussi d, Katell Vi´e d, Val´erie Desauziers e, Isabelle Momas a, Nathalie Seta a, Sophie Achard a
a Laboratoire de Sant´e Publique et Environnement, Hera “Health Environmental Risk Assessment”, Inserm UMR1153-CRESS (Centre de Recherche en Epid´emiologie et StatistiqueS), Universit´e de Paris, Facult´e de Pharmacie de Paris, 4, Avenue de L’Observatoire, 75006, Paris, France
b Unit´e de Chimie Environnementale et Interactions sur le Vivant UR4492, SFR Condorcet FR CNRS 3417, Maison de La Recherche en Environnement Industriel 2, Universit´e Du Littoral Cˆote D’Opale, 189A Avenue Maurice Schumann, 59140, Dunkerque, France
c Centre Commun de Mesures (CCM), Universit´e Du Littoral-Cˆote D’Opale, 145 Avenue Maurice Schumann, 5914, Dunkerque, France
d Laboratoires Clarins, 5 Rue Amp`ere, 95300, Pontoise, France
e IPREM, IMT Mines Ales, Universit´e de Pau et des Pays de L’Adour, E2S UPPA, CNRS, Pau, France

 

In the course of this study, they tested various pollutants with different chemical compositions, applying them to the apical side of Reconstructed Human Epidermis and being particularly interested in the effect relative humidity has on the reaction to pollutants. Investigating several cytokines and chemokines, they showed that IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and RANTES are the cytokines/chemokines almost systematically induced by most pollutants.

 

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (13)

21. May. 2020

A novel TEM grid sampler for airborne particles to measure the cell culture surface dose

Sonja Mülhopt1, Christoph Schlager2, Markus Berger2, Sivakumar Murugadoss3, Peter H. Hoet3, Tobias Krebs2, Hanns-Rudolf paur1 & Dieter Stapf1
1Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Technical Chemistry, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344, Germany. 
2Vitrocell Systems GmbH, Waldkirch, 79183, Germany. 
3KU Leuven, Environment and Health, Leuven, 3000, Belgium.

 

The surface dose and the spatial distribution on the membrane delivers important data for  measuring dose-response relationships in toxicity studies.  Image evaluation of transmission electron  microscopy (TEM) samples is a highly sensitive method for determination of deposition. This paper reports  the development and characterization of a novel holder for film coated TEM copper grids, which allows for  sampling under identical geometric and ambient conditions as in a cell culture chamber. 

 

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (286)

13. May. 2020

An Air-liquid Interface Bronchial Epithelial Model for Realistic, Repeated Inhalation Exposure to Airborne Particles for Toxicity Testing

DOI:10.3791/61210 


Hedwig M. Braakhuis1, Ruiwen He1,2, Rob J. Vandebriel1, Eric R. Gremmer1, Edwin Zwart1, Jolanda P. Vermeulen1, Paul Fokkens1, John Boere1, Ilse Gosens1, Flemming R. Cassee1,2 
1National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) 
2Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS) 


This article provides a method for culturing and exposing the human bronchial epithelial cell line Calu-37 at the Air-liquid Interface that mimics realistic, repeated inhalation exposure conditions that can be used for toxicity testing. By applying a continuous airflow using the Automated Exposure System, the cell model can be exposed to a low concentration of particles over a longer time period, reflecting realistic exposure conditions. Characteristics of both the cell model and of  the exposure system are essential for achieving a realistic inhalation exposure model that can be used for repeated exposures. 

 

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (165)

28. Feb. 2020

Lung Cell Exposure to Secondary Photochemical Aerosols Generated From OH Oxidation of Cyclic Siloxanes

DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.125126 

Autors

Benjamin M King 1 , Nathan J Janechek 1 , Nathan Bryngelson 1 , Andrea Adamcakova-Dodd 2 , Traci Lersch 3 , Kristin Bunker 3 , Gary Casuccio 3 , Peter S Thorne 2 , Charles O Stanier 4 , Jennifer Fiegel 5 

1Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
2Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, 145 N. Riverside Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
3RJ Lee Group, 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA, 15146, USA.
4Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. Electronic address: charles-stanier@uiowa.edu.
5Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. Electronic address: jennifer-fiegel@uiowa.edu.

 

A549 Lung cells were exposed to the secondary organosilicon aerosols using the Vitrocell 6 air-liquid interface system.

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (92)

25. Feb. 2020

Comparison of in vitro toxicity of aerosolized engineered nanomaterials using air-liquid interface mono-culture and co-culture models

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.impact.2020.100215

Autors

Yifang Wanga, Andrea,Adamcakova-Doddb, Benjamin R.Steinesb, Xuefang Jingb, Aliasger K.Salemc, Peter S.Thorneab
a Human Toxicology Interdisciplinary Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA
b Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA
c College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA

 

Highlights
• An in vitro co-culture model utilizing endothelial and epithelial cells and differentiated macrophages was established.
• Air-liquid interface exposures to Ag-SiO2 and CuO nanoparticles produced cell death, oxidative stress and cytokine release.
• Mono- and co-culture models showed comparable excposure outcomes except that cytokines were higher in the co-culture system.
• Compared to epithelia cells or macrophages alone, responses to CuO in the co-culture model indicated cellular interaction

 

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (333)

31. Dec. 2019

High Throughput Air Liquid Interface Exposure Modules: Characterization of Smoke/Aerosol Dosimetry and in vitro Mutagenicity and Cytotoxicity of Two Tobacco Product Types

Robert Leverette1, Brian Keyser1, Michael Hollings2 and Adam Seymour2
1RAI Services Company, Winston−Salem, NC 27101 USA
2Covance Laboratories Ltd., Harrogate, North Yorkshire HG3 1PY, UK

 

• Freshly generated whole smoke / aerosol from three different tobacco product types (3R4F, THP and ENDS) was consistently delivered within the AMES 48 and 6/48 exposure modules.
• Biological endpoints: 3R4F whole smoke induced increased revertant counts (Ames) and cytotoxicity (NRU) in the AMES 48 and 6/48 modules, respectively.
• Revertant counts (Ames) and cytotoxicity (IC50) values were comparable to those from the standard exposure modules when run under similar exposure conditions.
• Overall, the AMES 48 and 6/48 modules are deemed “Fit for Use" for the in vitrO evaluation of different tobacco product types (combustible, THP, ENDS).
 

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (4)

30. Nov. 2019

Dosimetric Analysis of Aerosol Generated by a Vitrocell® VC10® Smoking Robot – Investigations on Dose Dependency and Consistency of Application


Adam Seymour, Michael Hollings, Joanne Larner and Julie Clements;

Covance Laboratories Ltd, Harrogate, UK


QCMs were used to assess the deposition of cigarette aerosol from a Vitrocell® VC10® in Vitrocell® Ames, 6/4, 12/4 and 24/4 exposure modules. The power to resolve difference between 8 and 1 SLPM is statistically significant in all module types assessed. Uniformity within each module was confirmed (P >0.98) in all module types, at all airflows. Repeatability was assessed and found to be consistent (no significant difference) in all module types at airflows of 10, 8 and 4 SLPM, however, at 1 SLPM a significant difference was noted in 9 out of 12 experiments – likely an artifact of high deposition.
These results show that exposures utilizing the Vitrocell® VC10® and associated modules are robust; but indicate the necessity of dosimetry measures to aid in the quantification of delivered dose.
 

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (3)

4. Nov. 2019

Investigation of multiple whole smoke dosimetry techniques using a VITROCELL®VC10® smoke exposure system

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxrep.2019.10.011

Brian M. Keysera, Robert Leverettea, Michael Hollingsb, Adam Seymourb, Lesley Reeveb, Wanda Fieldsa
a RAI Services Company, Scientific & Regulatory Affairs, 401 North Main Street, Winston-Salem, NC, 27101, USA1
b Covance Laboratories Ltd., North Yorkshire, UK

 

Highlights
• Investigation of dose-determining methods using the Vitrocell® VC10® system.
• Dose assessment using Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) and aerosol photometers.
• Dose assessment using fluorescence of DMSO-captured smoke constituents.
• QCM, photometer AUC, and DMSO-captured matter were consistent and reproducible

 

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (1622)

25. Oct. 2019

Media Inserts for VITROCELL® Exposure Modules 6 and 12 Series

User Group Meeting 2019

Oliver Wisser1, Bastian Gutmann1, Adam Seymour2
1VITROCELL Systems GmbH 79183 Waldkirch, Germany
2Covance Laboratories Ltd Harrogate, UK

The poster shows the new media inserts.

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (1848)

15. Oct. 2019

Lung cell exposure to secondary photochemical aerosols generated from OH oxidation of cyclic siloxanes

DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.125126

Autors

King BM1, Janechek NJ1, Bryngelson N1, Adamcakova-Dodd A2, Lersch T3, Bunker K3, Casuccio G3, Thorne PS2, Stanier CO4, Fiegel J5.

1 Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
2 Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, 145 N. Riverside Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
3 RJ Lee Group, 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA, 15146, USA.
4 Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. Electronic address: charles-stanier@uiowa.edu.
5 Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. Electronic address: jennifer-fiegel@uiowa.edu.

 

Highlights
• Oxidative flow reactor used to study effects of secondary aerosols on lung cells.
• Nanoparticulate aerosols generated from OH oxidation of D5, a cyclic siloxane.
• Acute exposures to 54–116 ng/cm2 achieved using the air-liquid interface (ALI) system.
• Cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects marginal or absent at these doses.

 

Read more

Comments (0) Number of views (119)
RSS
12345678
Back to Top