Advanced in vitro exposure systems.

12. Aug. 2021

Product News 08/2021

VITROCELL® Remote Assist Support

Let us lend you a helping hand via HoloLens

VITROCELL in vitro exposure systems are specifically manufactured according to customer specifications. Our customers in the field of research & development typically have very complex requirements for the system. This is why a VITROCELL technician is required to carry out product training as well as service & support.
We strive to provide rapid responses and problem-solving for VITROCELL users all over the world.

VITROCELL® Remote Assist Support

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19. Apr. 2021

Product News 04/2021

The new VITROCELL® Millicell Holder

How to use Millicell 24-well Standing Inserts in the VITROCELL® 12 Module Series

The revolutionary new holder system enables for the use of standing inserts in all modules of the VITROCELL® 12 Series for 12-well sized inserts. As an additional advantage, the media com­partment is sealed towards the aerosol exposure head to avoid contact of the test substance with the cell culture media.

VITROCELL® Millicell Holder – How to use Millicell 24-well Standing inserts in the VITROCELL® 12 Module Series

 

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3. Mar. 2021

Vitrocell® Leak Tester

Must-have device for aerosol research – easy and efficient leak detection

Regular leak tests are mandatory in aerosol research. A leak caused by a forgotten connection or defective o-ring may have a significant influence on the aerosol exposure process. We recommend to carry out a leak test prior to the experiment and as part of cleaning or service routine.

VITROCELL Application Note

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30. Nov. 2020

Product News 12/2020

VITROCELL® 12/12 now available with Climatic Chamber

For reliable aerosol exposure of cell cultures using 12- or 24-well sized inserts

The VITROCELL® 12/12 module system has been designed to facilitate the exposure of mammalian cell cultures to airborne substances such as gases, complex mixtures, nanoparticles and fibers. It features a throughput of 3 dilution steps @ 3 replicates and 1 clean air control at 3 replicates. In order to optimize the exposure for liquid aerosols and to maximize the performance of humidified air supply it is now also available in a user-friendly climatic chamber.

VITROCELL® 12/12 now available with Climatic Chamber

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28. Nov. 2020

Parametric Optimization of an Air–Liquid Interface System for Flow-Through Inhalation Exposure to Nanoparticles: Assessing Dosimetry and Intracellular Uptake of CeO2 Nanoparticles

doi:10.3390/nano10122369

Lars B. Leibrock 1, Harald Jungnickel 1, Jutta Tentschert 1, Aaron Katz 1, Blaza Toman 2 , Elijah J. Petersen 3 , Frank S. Bierkandt 1, Ajay Vikram Singh 1 , Peter Laux 1 and Andreas Luch 1
1 German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemical and Product Safety, Max-Dohrn-Strasse 8-10, 10589 Berlin, Germany; 
2 Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaitherburg, MD 20899-8311, USA; 
3 Materials Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaitherburg, MD 20899-8311, USA; 

 

ALI systems are considered to be a promising exposure system to study toxicological e ects of airborne nanomaterials instead of in vivo inhalation studies and have been widely used to assess the toxicology of nanomaterials in recent years. However, the robustness of these methods is not yet wellunderstood. Here we reported a C&E analysis of a commonly used flow through ALI exposure system.

 

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29. Sep. 2020

Invited review: human air-liquid-interface organotypic airway tissue models derived from primary tracheobronchial epithelial cells—overview and perspectives

https://doi.org/10.1007/s11626-020-00517-7


Xuefei Cao1, Jayme P. Coyle2, Rui Xiong1, Yiying Wang1, Robert H. Heflich1, Baiping Ren1, William M. Gwinn3, Patrick Hayden4, Liying Rojanasakul2

1 Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Rd., AR Jefferson, USA
2 Allergy and Clinical Immunology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers forDisease Control and Prevention,Morgantown,WV, USA
3 Division of the National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Durham, NC, USA
4 BioSurfaces Inc., Ashland, MA, USA


One important element for validating any new assay for making regulatory decisions is determining its performance relative to an accepted standard. Conducting in vivo inhalation toxicity studies using whole-body or nose-only exposure systems is expensive and time-consuming and typically requires a large number of animals. The goal of using alternative methods, like human in vitro ALI airway cultures, ultimately is to replace inhalation toxicity testing in animals with in vitro approaches. Transition from animal- to human-based models is ultimately expected to lead to faster and better predictive toxicity assessments and therapeutic development at lower cost.  This study shows the development and validation of alternative in vitro methods for acute toxicity testing, including acute inhalation toxicity testing.
 

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15. Aug. 2020

Development of an in vitro approach to point-of-contact inhalation toxicity testing of volatile compounds, using organotypic culture and air-liquid interface exposure

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2020.104968

Artik Mistry, Larry E. Bowen, Michael W. Dzierlenga, Jessica K. Hartman, Scott D. Slattery
ScitoVation, LLC, Durham, NC 27713, United States
 

In this project, an incremental approach to assay development, taking small steps that built understanding of the biology and confidence in the methods were taken to attempted. Focused on general cell health assays (viability,cytotoxicity, TEER), as well as a mechanism-of-action-specific assay (GSH depletion), we found all assays to be sufficiently sensitive over the full range of possible values for both cell culture models (BEAS-2B cell and EpiAirway cultures)
 

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21. May. 2020

A novel TEM grid sampler for airborne particles to measure the cell culture surface dose

Sonja Mülhopt1, Christoph Schlager2, Markus Berger2, Sivakumar Murugadoss3, Peter H. Hoet3, Tobias Krebs2, Hanns-Rudolf paur1 & Dieter Stapf1
1Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Technical Chemistry, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344, Germany. 
2Vitrocell Systems GmbH, Waldkirch, 79183, Germany. 
3KU Leuven, Environment and Health, Leuven, 3000, Belgium.

 

The surface dose and the spatial distribution on the membrane delivers important data for  measuring dose-response relationships in toxicity studies.  Image evaluation of transmission electron  microscopy (TEM) samples is a highly sensitive method for determination of deposition. This paper reports  the development and characterization of a novel holder for film coated TEM copper grids, which allows for  sampling under identical geometric and ambient conditions as in a cell culture chamber. 

 

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24. Mar. 2020

Comparison of Vapor and Liquid Phase Acrolein Exposures to Air Liquid Interface (ALI) Cell Cultures

David H. Brandwein, F. Adam Bettmann, Michael P. DeLorme, Alan T. Eveland, Lawrence M. Milchak 
3M Corporate Toxicology and Environmental Science, St. Paul, MN
 

The STL is working to develop an in vitro screening ALI model to assess the acute respiratory irritation potential for new chemicals. These experiments examined multiple aspects of the model, including different cell culture systems (A549 and EpiAirway), different exposure methods (dynamic vapor and liquid phase), and different post exposure periods, all using acrolein as a model respiratory irritant. The goal was to better understand the critical parameters of the cell systems and exposure methods to enable the development of a consistent screening model, while gaining clarity of the dosimetry. 

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15. Jan. 2020

Use of in vitro 3D tissue models in genotoxicity testing: Strategic fit, validation status and way forward.

Report of the working group from the 7th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT)

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mrgentox.2020.503135

Authors
StefanPfuhlera, Janvan Benthemb, RodgerCurrenc, Shareen H.Doakd, MariaDusinskae, MakotoHayashif, Robert H.Heflichg, DarrenKiddh, DavidKirklandi, YangLuanj, GladysOuedraogok, KerstinReisingerl, ToshioSofunim, Frédériquevan Ackern, YingYango, RaffaellaCorvip
a Procter and Gamble, Mason Business Centre, Mason, OH, USA
b National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Centre for Health Protection, Bilthoven, the Netherlands
c Institute for In Vitro Sciences, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, USA
d Swansea University Medical School, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP, Wales, UK
e Health Effects Laboratory, Department of Environmental Chemistry, NILU-Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller, Norway
f makoto international consulting, Ebina, Japan
g U.S. Food and Drug Administration/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR, USA
h Covance Laboratories Ltd, Otley Road, Harrogate, HG3 1PY, UK
i Kirkland Consulting, PO Box 79, Tadcaster, LS24 0AS, UK
j School of Public Health, Hongqiao International Institute of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025, PR China
k L’Oréal R&I, Aulnay-sous-bois, France
l Henkel AG & Co KGaA, Duesseldorf, Germany
m Formerly National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo, Japan
n Triskelion B.V., Zeist, the Netherlands
o Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou, PR China
p European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy

 

Highlights
• Extensive progress made in development of 3D organ-based genotoxicity assays.
• 3D culture models represent major exposure routes: dermal, oral, inhalation.
• The 3D skin comet and MN assays are considered mature and sufficiently validated.
• Liver and airway model-based genotoxicity assays show promise but are at early stage.<

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