Advanced in vitro exposure systems.

25. Jun. 2020

Novel TEM Grid holders for dose determination of airborne particles during in vitro Exposure at the air / liquid interface

The assessment of toxicological effects of airborne particles to the human organism is of major importance in disease research. The presence of nano and ultrafine particles can be found both in indoor and outdoor atmospheres which include workplaces and living areas. Over the last years, the degree of contribution to diseases of such particles is analyzed ever more frequent by the use of in vitro methods. The required equipment for these studies consisting of aerosol generation and exposure systems are nowadays developed more and more to proven levels.

VITROCELL Application Note.

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21. May. 2020

A novel TEM grid sampler for airborne particles to measure the cell culture surface dose

Sonja Mülhopt1, Christoph Schlager2, Markus Berger2, Sivakumar Murugadoss3, Peter H. Hoet3, Tobias Krebs2, Hanns-Rudolf paur1 & Dieter Stapf1
1Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Technical Chemistry, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344, Germany. 
2Vitrocell Systems GmbH, Waldkirch, 79183, Germany. 
3KU Leuven, Environment and Health, Leuven, 3000, Belgium.

 

The surface dose and the spatial distribution on the membrane delivers important data for  measuring dose-response relationships in toxicity studies.  Image evaluation of transmission electron  microscopy (TEM) samples is a highly sensitive method for determination of deposition. This paper reports  the development and characterization of a novel holder for film coated TEM copper grids, which allows for  sampling under identical geometric and ambient conditions as in a cell culture chamber. 

 

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13. May. 2020

An Air-liquid Interface Bronchial Epithelial Model for Realistic, Repeated Inhalation Exposure to Airborne Particles for Toxicity Testing

DOI:10.3791/61210 


Hedwig M. Braakhuis1, Ruiwen He1,2, Rob J. Vandebriel1, Eric R. Gremmer1, Edwin Zwart1, Jolanda P. Vermeulen1, Paul Fokkens1, John Boere1, Ilse Gosens1, Flemming R. Cassee1,2 
1National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) 
2Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS) 


This article provides a method for culturing and exposing the human bronchial epithelial cell line Calu-37 at the Air-liquid Interface that mimics realistic, repeated inhalation exposure conditions that can be used for toxicity testing. By applying a continuous airflow using the Automated Exposure System, the cell model can be exposed to a low concentration of particles over a longer time period, reflecting realistic exposure conditions. Characteristics of both the cell model and of  the exposure system are essential for achieving a realistic inhalation exposure model that can be used for repeated exposures. 

 

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14. Apr. 2020

Toxicity and Gene Expression Profiling of Copper- and Titanium-Based Nanoparticles Using Air–Liquid Interface Exposure

https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemrestox.9b00489


Matthias Hufnagel, Sarah Schoch, Johanna WallBettina, Maria Strauch, Andrea Hartwig
Department of Food Chemistry and Toxicology, Institute of Applied Biosciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Adenauerring 20a, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany

 

In this study an ALI exposure was combined with a high-throughput RT-qPCR approach to evaluate the toxicological potential nanoparticles in A549 cells.

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20. Mar. 2020

Use of EpiAlveolar Lung Model to Predict Fibrotic Potential of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.9b06860

Autors
Barosova H1, Maione AG2, Septiadi D1, Sharma M3, Haeni L1, Balog S1, O'Connell O2, Jackson GR2, Brown D4, Clippinger AJ3, Hayden P2,5, Petri-Fink A1,6, Stone V4, Rothen-Rutishauser B1.

1 Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Chemin des Verdiers 4, 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland.
2 MatTek Corporation, 200 Homer Avenue, Ashland, Massachusetts 01721, United States.
3 PETA International Science Consortium Ltd., 8 All Saints Street, London N1 9RL, U.K.
4 Nano-Safety Research Group, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, U.K.
5 BioSurfaces, Inc., 200 Homer Ave, Ashland, Massachusetts 01721, United States.
6 Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 9, 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland.

 

This study characterizes a 3D in vitro alveolar tissue model comprised entirely of primary human cells to investigate its ability to predict pulmonary fibrosis. The study demonstrated that the EpiAlveolar model recapitulates relevant lung phenotypes and functions and is stable at VITROCELL Cloud with repeated exposures over 3 weeks. 

 

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28. Feb. 2020

Lung Cell Exposure to Secondary Photochemical Aerosols Generated From OH Oxidation of Cyclic Siloxanes

DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.125126 

Autors

Benjamin M King 1 , Nathan J Janechek 1 , Nathan Bryngelson 1 , Andrea Adamcakova-Dodd 2 , Traci Lersch 3 , Kristin Bunker 3 , Gary Casuccio 3 , Peter S Thorne 2 , Charles O Stanier 4 , Jennifer Fiegel 5 

1Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
2Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, 145 N. Riverside Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
3RJ Lee Group, 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA, 15146, USA.
4Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. Electronic address: charles-stanier@uiowa.edu.
5Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. Electronic address: jennifer-fiegel@uiowa.edu.

 

A549 Lung cells were exposed to the secondary organosilicon aerosols using the Vitrocell 6 air-liquid interface system.

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25. Feb. 2020

Comparison of in vitro toxicity of aerosolized engineered nanomaterials using air-liquid interface mono-culture and co-culture models

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.impact.2020.100215

Autors

Yifang Wanga, Andrea,Adamcakova-Doddb, Benjamin R.Steinesb, Xuefang Jingb, Aliasger K.Salemc, Peter S.Thorneab
a Human Toxicology Interdisciplinary Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA
b Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA
c College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA

 

Highlights
• An in vitro co-culture model utilizing endothelial and epithelial cells and differentiated macrophages was established.
• Air-liquid interface exposures to Ag-SiO2 and CuO nanoparticles produced cell death, oxidative stress and cytokine release.
• Mono- and co-culture models showed comparable excposure outcomes except that cytokines were higher in the co-culture system.
• Compared to epithelia cells or macrophages alone, responses to CuO in the co-culture model indicated cellular interaction

 

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19. Feb. 2020

Differences in cytotoxicity of lung epithelial cells exposed to titanium dioxide nanofibers and nanoparticles: Comparison of air-liquid interface and submerged cellcultures

doi: 10.1016/j.tiv.2020.104798

Autors

Medina-Reyes EI1, Delgado-Buenrostro NL2, Leseman DL3, Déciga-Alcaraz A2, He R4, Gremmer ER3, Fokkens PHB3, Flores-Flores JO5, Cassee FR4, Chirino YI2.
1 Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis y Toxicología, Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Estado de México, Mexico. Electronic address: medinaingrid0@gmail.com.
2 Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis y Toxicología, Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Estado de México, Mexico.
3 National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands.
4 National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands; Institute of Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
5 Instituto de Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, CP 04510 Ciudad de México, Mexico

 

The Air-liquid interface (ALI) model has emerged as a closer physiological system that mimics exposure in gaseous and liquid phases. This Study shows that the exposure to TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles displays similar toxicity both the ALI and submerged cell cultures, using lung epithelial A549 cells. Additionally, they detected for the first time that TiO2 nanofibers were located into the nucleus.

 

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31. Oct. 2019

Deposition efficiency and uniformity of monodisperse solid particle deposition in the Vitrocell® 24/48 Air–Liquid-Interface in vitro exposure system

Aerosol Science and Technology

DOI: 10.1080/02786826.2019.1676877

Michael J. Oldhama , Nicolas Castroa, Jingjie Zhanga, Ali Rostamia, Francesco Luccib, Yezdi Pithawallaa,
Arkadiusz K. Kuczajb,c , I. Gene Gilmand, Pasha Kosachevskye, Julia Hoengb, and K. Monica Leea
aAltria Client Services, Richmond, Virginia, USA; 
bPhilip Morris International Research & Development, Philip Morris Products S.A. (part of Philip Morris International group of companies), Neuchatel, Switzerland; 
cMultiscale Modeling & Simulation, Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Twente, AE Enschede, The Netherlands; 
dEnthalpy Analytical, Durham, North Carolina, USA; eEnthalpy Analytical, Richmond, Virginia, USA

 

Monodispersed solid particles were used to investigate experimental measurement of deposition efficiency, variability of deposition efficiency within and between rows and uniformity of deposition across all cell culture inserts of the Vitrocell 24/48 ALI in vitro exposure system.

 

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15. Oct. 2019

Lung cell exposure to secondary photochemical aerosols generated from OH oxidation of cyclic siloxanes

DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.125126

Autors

King BM1, Janechek NJ1, Bryngelson N1, Adamcakova-Dodd A2, Lersch T3, Bunker K3, Casuccio G3, Thorne PS2, Stanier CO4, Fiegel J5.

1 Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
2 Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, 145 N. Riverside Dr., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.
3 RJ Lee Group, 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA, 15146, USA.
4 Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. Electronic address: charles-stanier@uiowa.edu.
5 Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Iowa, 4133 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA. Electronic address: jennifer-fiegel@uiowa.edu.

 

Highlights
• Oxidative flow reactor used to study effects of secondary aerosols on lung cells.
• Nanoparticulate aerosols generated from OH oxidation of D5, a cyclic siloxane.
• Acute exposures to 54–116 ng/cm2 achieved using the air-liquid interface (ALI) system.
• Cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects marginal or absent at these doses.

 

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