Advanced in vitro exposure systems.

Development of a quantitative method for assessment of dose in in vitro evaluations using a VITROCELL® VC10® smoke exposure system

18. Dec. 2018

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2018.12.010

Brian M. Keysera, Robert Leverettea, Kathy Fowlera, Wanda Fieldsa, Victoria Hargreavesb, Lesley Reeveb, Betsy Bombicka
a RAI Services Company1, Scientific & Regulatory Affairs, 401 North Main Street, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, USA
b Covance Laboratories Ltd., North Yorkshire, UK

The aims of this study were to investigate dosimetry during whole smoke exposure in the VITROCELL® VC10® smoking robot using QCMs and to determine whether photometers could be used for concurrent assessment of dose during in vitro whole smoke exposures.

 

A B S T R A C T
The assessment of potential cytotoxicity or genotoxicity of combustible tobacco products has historically been performed using partitioned exposures (i.e. total particulate matter [TPM], gas vapor phase [GVP]) rather than whole smoke. The VITROCELL® VC10® smoke exposure system offers multiple platforms for air liquid interface (ALI) or air agar interface (AAI) exposure to mimic in vivo-like conditions for assessing the toxicological impact of whole smoke using in vitro assays (e.g. cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and DNA modifications). The aims of this study were to investigate dosimetry during whole smoke exposure in the VITROCELL® VC10® smoking robot using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) and to support the use of photometers for concurrent assessment of ‘dose’ during whole smoke exposures. QCM results showed consistent deposition across different exposure chambers, between dilution bars, experiments and modules. Higher levels of variation were noted at higher airflows (i.e.,>8 L/min). Dosimetry assessed using photometers also showed a high level of consistency between experiments, with no notable impact on deposition on the QCM when the photometers were placed ‘inline’ between the dilution bar and the exposure module. However, the use of photometers alone may be not be sufficient to estimate deposition; the predictability of the data-generated equation was poor. Further development of dosimetry methodology and information for use in validated in vitro biological test methods is needed to facilitate on-going aerosol-based research and relative assessment.

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